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ATK for Reaper : Public Beta (version 1.0.b3)

2014-09-12

Zoomtransform          Directtransform

Ambisonic Toolkit for Reaper is now available
as a public beta (version 1.0 beta 3).

While there is a well-established workflow for stereo production in DAWs, options have been more limited when working with Ambisonics. The Ambisonic Toolkit (ATK) brings together a number of tools and transforms for working with first order Ambisonic surround sound, and includes intriguing possibilities for spatial soundfield imaging.

The ATK toolset in intended to be both ergonomic and comprehensive, framed so that the user is enabled to ‘think Ambisonic’. By this, the ATK addresses the holistic problem of creatively controlling a complete soundfield, facilitating spatial composition beyond simple placement of sounds in a sound-scene. The artist is empowered to address the impression and imaging of a soundfield — taking advantage of the native soundfield-kernel paradigm the Ambisonic technique presents.

ATK has previously only been available for public release via the SuperCollider real-time processing environment. Cockos Reaper is a reasonably priced and flexible DAW, popular among many composers and sonic artists working with spatial sound. Reaper’s versatile design conveniently supports the ATK’s Ambisonic workflow model.

Using the JSFX text-based scripting language, the ATK has now been ported to plugins for Reaper. Several of the plugins, in particular the transforms, offers intuitive graphical user interfaces that helps visualise the effect of the various transforms. The plugins work with all operation system and processor versions that Reaper supports. On the Windows platform the plugins can also be used with other VST-hosts by means of the ReaJS ReaPlug plugin.

The ATK toolset has been been gathered, authored and developed by Joseph Anderson over a number of years, and is now a collaborative open source project. The port of ATK to Reaper has been done by Trond Lossius of BEK, Bergen Center for Electronic Arts.

A paper on ATK for Reaper by Trond Lossius and Joseph Anderson will be presented at the upcoming joint ICMC | SMC conference in Athens. If you are attending the conference, please drop by during the poster session next Thursday!

Papers at ICMC / SMC

2014-09-12

Next week the joint ICMC / SMC (International Computer Music Conference / Sound and Music Computing Conference) takes place in Athens. I’m involved with three papers and a demo session during the conference. I very much look forward to the conference, and to present everything that we have been working on.

The papers are available from the text section of this web site.

 

ATK Reaper: The Ambisonic Toolkit as JSFX plugins

by Trond Lossius and Joseph Anderson

Screen_shot_2014-08-21_at_13

Thursday 18, September 2014
12:10-12:45: Poster Session craze – Odeon 1
12:45-14:30: Poster Session - Odeon 0

While there is a well-established workflow for stereo production in DAWs, options have been more limited when working with Ambisonics. The Ambisonic Toolkit (ATK) brings together a number of tools and transforms for working with first order Ambisonic surround sound, and includes intriguing possibilities for spatial soundfield imaging. These tools have previously only been available for public release via the SuperCollider real-time processing environment.

Cockos Reaper is a reasonably priced and flexible DAW, popular among many composers and sonic art\-ists working with spatial sound. Reaper’s versatile design conveniently supports the ATK’s Ambisonic workflow model. Using the JSFX text-based scripting language, the ATK has now been ported to plugins for Reaper; these include intuitive graphical user interfaces.

 

Model-View-Controller separation in Max using Jamoma

by Trond Lossius, Theo de la Hogue, Pascal Baltazar, Tim Place, Nathan Wolek and Julien Rabin

Using

Wednesday, 17 September
09:00-10:40: Oral session – Computer environments for sound/music processing (1) – Odeon 4

The Model-View-Controller (MVC) software architecture pattern separates these three program components, and is well-suited for interactive applications where flexible human-computer interfaces are required. Separating data presentation from the underlying process enables multiple views of the same model, customised views, synchronisation between views, as well as views that can be dynamically loaded, bound to a model, and then disposed. Jamoma 0.6 enables MVC separation in Cycling’74 Max through custom externals and patching guidelines for developers. Models and views can then be nested for a hierarchal structuring of services.
A local preset system is available in all models, along with namespace and services that can be inspected and queried application-wide. This system can be used to manage cues with modular, stringent and transparent handling of priorities. It can also be expanded for inter-application exchange, enabling the distribution of models and views over a network using OSC and Minuit. While this paper demonstrates key principles via simple patchers, a more elaborate demonstration of MVC separation in Max is provided in Lossius et. al. (2014a).

 

Demo: Using Jamoma’s MVC features to design an audio effect interface

by Trond Lossius, Nathan Wolek, Theo de la Hogue and Pascal Baltazar

Eqviews

Monday 15 September 2014
09:50-10:40: Demo session – Room A

The Model-View-Controller (MVC) software architecture pattern separates these three program components, and is well-suited for interactive applications where flexible human-computer interfaces are required. Separating data presentation from the underlying process enables multiple views of the same model, customised views, synchronisation between views, and views that can be dynamically loaded, repurposed, and disposed.

The use of MVC is widespread in web applications, but is far less common in interactive computer music programming environments. Jamoma 0.6 enables MVC separation in Cycling’74 Max, as presented in Lossius et. al. (2014b). This demonstration will examine the development of a multi-band equaliser using these recent additions to Jamoma. This review of the design process will serve to highlight many of the benefits of MVC separation.

 

The SpatDIF library – Concept and practical applications in audio software

by Jan C. Schacher, Chikashi Miyama and Trond Lossius

Playback_maxpatch

Poster session Monday, 15 September 2014
12:10-12:45: Poster Session craze – Odeon 1
12:45-14:30: Poster Session - Odeon 0

The development of SpatDIF, the Spatial Sound Description Interchange Format, continues with the implementation of concrete software tools. In order to make SpatDIF usable in audio workflows, two types of code implementations are developed. The first is the C/C++ software library `libspatdif’, whose purpose is to provide a reference implementation of SpatDIF. The class structure of this library and its main components embodies the principles derived from the concepts and specification of SpatDIF. The second type of tool are specific implementations in audio programming environments, which demonstrate the methods and best-use practices for working with SpatDIF. Two practical scenarios demonstrates the use of an external in MaxMSP and Pure Data as well as the implementation of the same example in a C++ environment. A short-term goal is the complete implementation of the existing specification within the library. A long-term perspective is to develop additional extensions that will further increase the utility of the SpatDIF format.

 

References

T. Lossius, N. Wolek, T. de la Hogue & P. Baltazar (2014a): Demo: Using Jamama’s MVC features to design an audio effect interface. Proceedings of the joint 40th International Computer Music Conference & 11th Sound and Music Computing Comference, Athens.

T. Lossius, T. de la Hogue, P. Baltazar, T. Place, N. Wolek & J. Rabin (2014b): Model-View-Controller separation in Max using Jamoma. Proceedings of the joint 40th International Computer Music Conference & 11th Sound and Music Computing Comference, Athens.

Call for beta testers : Ambisonic Toolkit for Reaper

2014-08-21

Screen_shot_2014-08-21_at_13

Over the past 1 1/2 year I have gradually been porting Ambisonic Toolkit by Joseph Anderson et. al. to a set of JS FX plugins for Reaper. ATK for Reaper consists of a number of plugins for encoding, transforming and decoding FOA sound fields, and contain several functionalities that to the best of my knowledge are not available in existing plugin suites for FOA.

Me and Joseph have been writing a paper on the subject that will be presented as a poster at the upcoming joint ICMC / SMC conference in Athens. I’d like to have an initial release of ATK for Reaper available for download by the time of the conference, but before letting it out in the wild, it would be useful to have some beta-testing in order to ensure that there are no obvious malfunctions, omissions or bad interaction design decisions in the first release. Hence I’m looking for a few beta testers to give some initial feedback on the plugin suite.

I have made an installer for OSX that should make it easy to get up and going. For Windows installing currently will require a bit of manual copying into the correct folders. I have not tested the plugins on Windows myself yet, but as it is all based on the JS FX scripting language, I would expect them to work the same there as on Mac. On Windows it would also be possible to test them with other VST hosts using ReaPlugs.

In particular I’m looking for feedback of the type:

  • “This seems to work well”
  • “This is just not working”
  • “This is just plain wrong”
  • “This is really nice and intuitive”
  • “This is not intuitive at all”
  • “I have a suggestion for an improvement: …”
  • etc.

Initial reactions to the plugins are particular useful, as the first reaction to user interfaces are often quite informative in terms of how the user interaction design works (or not).

If you are (1) a regular user of Reaper, (2) have prior experience with first order ambisonic, and (3) have the interest and some available time over the next two weeks for testing and providing feedback, please contact me. If you have prior experience with ATK for SuperCollider, that would be useful as well. Please also provide me with information on what OS you are using.

And if you have prior experience with building installers for Windows that would be particularly useful, I might need some help when attempting to solve this one.

Ambisonic plugin as screen-saver

2014-08-20

Screen and sound capture of the FOA Mirror Transform plugin, part of the soon-to-be-released “Ambisonic Toolkit for Reaper”, a suite of JS FX plugins for Cockos Reaper for encoding, transforming and decoding first order ambisonic sound fields.

In this example I’m using plugin parameter automation in Reaper to generate the continuous rotations.

Please listen using headphones.

Teaser...

2014-08-17

Screen_shot_2014-08-17_at_18

Installer Welcome Screen

 

Screen_shot_2014-08-17_at_18

Installer Read Me Screen

 
 
 

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