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Customising TexShop editor color scheme

2014-03-17

Screen_shot_2014-03-17_at_08

I’m currently writing up submissions for upcoming conferences, preferring to use LaTex rather than regular word processors. However I find the default “black font on white background” colour scheme of the TexShop editor straining to the eye when at it for hours. The TexShop Preferences does not leave much options for customising its colours, but it seems like more can be done as a series of Terminal commands. So here are the commands required to use the Solaraized color scheme, retrieved from one of the issues in the Solarized repository:

	# solarized dark color scheme

	# background = solarized base03 = 0  43  54
	defaults write TeXShop background_R 0.00
	defaults write TeXShop background_G 0.169
	defaults write TeXShop background_B 0.212

	# commands = solarized red = 220  50  47
	defaults write TeXShop commandred 0.86
	defaults write TeXShop commandgreen 0.196
	defaults write TeXShop commandblue 0.184

	# comments = solarized base01 = 88 110 117
	defaults write TeXShop commentred 0.345
	defaults write TeXShop commentgreen 0.431
	defaults write TeXShop commentblue 0.459

	# foreground = solarized base0 = 131 148 150
	defaults write TeXShop foreground_R 0.514
	defaults write TeXShop foreground_G 0.580
	defaults write TeXShop foreground_B 0.589

	# index = solarized magenta = 211  54 130
	defaults write TeXShop indexred 0.83
	defaults write TeXShop indexgreen 0.21
	defaults write TeXShop indexblue 0.51

	# marker = solarized cyan = 42 161 152
	defaults write TeXShop markerred 0.165
	defaults write TeXShop markergreen 0.63
	defaults write TeXShop markerblue 0.596

	# insertionpoint = solarized base0 = 131 148 150
	defaults write TeXShop insertionpoint_R 0.514
	defaults write TeXShop insertionpoint_G 0.580
	defaults write TeXShop insertionpoint_B 0.589

And here are the commands required for the solarized light colour scheme:

	# solarized light color scheme

	# background = solarized base3 = 253 246 227
	defaults write TeXShop background_R 0.99
	defaults write TeXShop background_G 0.96
	defaults write TeXShop background_B 0.89

	# commands = solarized red = 220  50  47
	defaults write TeXShop commandred 0.86
	defaults write TeXShop commandgreen 0.196
	defaults write TeXShop commandblue 0.184

	# comments = solarized base1 = 147 161 161
	defaults write TeXShop commentred 0.58
	defaults write TeXShop commentgreen 0.63
	defaults write TeXShop commentblue 0.63

	# foreground = solarized base00 = 101 123 131
	defaults write TeXShop foreground_R 0.40
	defaults write TeXShop foreground_G 0.48
	defaults write TeXShop foreground_B 0.51

	# index = solarized magenta = 211  54 130
	defaults write TeXShop indexred 0.83
	defaults write TeXShop indexgreen 0.21
	defaults write TeXShop indexblue 0.51

	# marker = solarized cyan = 42 161 152
	defaults write TeXShop markerred 0.165
	defaults write TeXShop markergreen 0.63
	defaults write TeXShop markerblue 0.596

	# insertionpoint = solarized base00 = 101 123 131
	defaults write TeXShop insertionpoint_R 0.40
	defaults write TeXShop insertionpoint_G 0.48
	defaults write TeXShop insertionpoint_B 0.51

If you want to do further customisations, you might also want to check out DonSchado’s Ruby script. And while at it, let’s customise the distance between lines in the editor as well:

	defaults write TeXShop SourceInterlineSpace 10.0

According to documentation only values between .5 and 40.0 will be accepted. The standard line spacing is given by the default 1.0, and double spacing is given by the value 10.0.

The Roaring Twenties

2014-02-03

New-york

Emily Thompson and Scott Mahoy has created a fascinating interactive mapping of the sounds of New York in the 1920s for the multimedia journal Vectors.

The sonic content at the heart of the journey consists of fifty-four unique excerpts of sound newsreel footage, Fox Movietone newsreels from 1926 through 1930. Fog horns, shouting peddlers, rumbling elevated trains, pounding riveters, and laughing children were all captured by the microphones and cameras of the Movietone men as they traversed the city searching for news.  Much of the footage deployed here was never edited into the published newsreels shown in motion picture theaters at that time, thus it is seen and heard on this website for the first time since those images and sounds were captured onto film.

Soundscape Renderer

2014-02-01

Mozart_full_muted_binaural

SSR in binaural mode

 

Mozart_full_muted_wfs

SSR in wave field synthesis mode

 

The SoundScape Renderer is a tool for real-time spatial audio reproduction providing a variety of rendering algorithms, e.g. Wave Field Synthesis, Higher-Order Ambisonics and binaural techniques. The SSR is currently available for Linux and Mac OS X and has been released as open source software under the GNU General Public License (GPL).

Noise reduction planning

2014-01-24

Image-108

Prognoses of estimated noise zones surrounding the airport in 2020. Red zone indicates 50 dB Lden or more, and the black line indicates 40 dB Lden or more. The two westbound fingers stretching out over Sotra are clear indicators of expected growth in noise from helicopter traffic to and from the oil rigs in the North Sea.

 

The Municipality of Bergen has recently launched a plan for noise reduction. Noise propagation from the main infrastructure noise sources (airport, railways, light rail, roads and the harbor) are identified, and an action plan has been prepared with the aim of reducing noise pollution. The plan is currently open for comments.

In somewhat related news the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has a Draft Guidance for Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Sound on Marine Mammals currently open for comments.

This document provides guidance for assessing the effects of anthropogenic (man-made) sound on marine mammal species. Specifically, it identifies the received levels, or thresholds, above which individual marine mammals are predicted to experience changes in their hearing sensitivity (either temporary or permanent) for all underwater anthropogenic sound sources. This guidance is intended to be used by analysts and managers and other relevant user groups and stakeholders, when seeking to determine whether and how their activities are expected to result in particular types of impacts to marine mammals via acoustic exposure.

Artist-in-residence at Marine Night Campaign

2014-01-15

Svalbard1024

For the next two weeks I’ve been invited to be artist-in-residence at the Marine Night campaign of the Mare Incognito Arctic marine biology research project. I’ll be spending 5 nights on FF Helmar Hansen, and then another week in Ny-Ålesund, finishing with a few nights in Longyearbyen.

I do not join the campaign with any pre-defined research questions or ideas for artistic projects. Instead I will start out with a set of working methods and a curious mind that, quoting one of Brian Eno’s oblique strategies, can be summoned as “once the search has begun, something will be found”.

I expect to spend a fair amount of time doing field recordings. In recent years I have done field recordings on a regular basis, most often using a surround (ambisonic) microphone to capture the sound of outdoor spaces. These recordings can be reproduced as 3D surround sound. Contrary to most music recording techniques, ambisonic recordings put an equal emphasis on sounds originating from any and all directions, with no filtering of “unwanted” sound from “unwanted” directions. I like this holistic and non-discriminating quality, and find the recordings interesting for their abilities to capture a sense of place, as opposed to recordings of select sounds disassociated from their surroundings.

During the campaign I hope to be able to do recordings of various outdoor environments (nature as well as inhabited places), as well as indoor places and their activities. Additional recordings using contact microphones capturing vibrations at various surfaces, as well as video recordings, will complement surround recordings. Elin Øyen Vister has been kind to lend me hydrophones and a Telinga parabol mic, and I’ll be experimenting with them as well.

During the campaign I also hope to be able to engage with the other participants, and learn more about their research. On a personal level the campaign offers possibilities for connecting strands of my various educations (I studied polar oceonography before I started studing music composition) in a way that I have not done before, and additionally I believe that a deeper engaging with and understanding of the places we will visit can not be done only by audio alone, but also need to encompass the research-related (and ultimately political) questions that the various research strands of the campaign address.

During this period I expect to be mostly offline, and with no phone connection. I’ll catch up on mails when I’m back home by the end of the mknth.

 
 
 

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